Jim Larkin the Irish Trade Unionist

Jim Larkin was an Irish trade union leader and a socialist activist born on the 21st January 1876 and died on 30th January 1947.

He was born to Irish parents in Liverpool, England, after which him and his parents moved to Burren, having grown up poor, he got little education and he had to work as a child cater for his family. In 1905, he became a full time trade union organizer. Learn more about Jim Larkin: http://spartacus-educational.com/IRElarkin.htm and http://www.irishexaminer.com/lifestyle/artsfilmtv/books/the-definitive-biography-of-big-jim-larkin-372254.html

He later on , in 1907,founded the Irish transport and general workers union after moving to Belfast, and then formed the workers union of Ireland and the Irish labor party, where the maximum changed the small group on staff members and people’s union into a larger group of people who he helped in salary increment and acquiring a suitable environment.

He helped the transformation of Ireland and made it a stronger and recognizable socialist common wealth. He emerged as a significant and influential leader in the labor movement in the year 1905, and in 1907, he became the organizer of the National Union of Dock Laborers. He is well known for reconciling catholic and protestant workers during a better pay and good working conditions protest. Read more: Jim Larkin | Wikipedia and James Larkin | Ireland Calling

Jim Larkin was driven by his hatred for injustice and his sympathy for the poor, which was characterized by his slogan “an injury for one is the concern for all”.

Jim became the leading advocate for the newly formed labor party I n 1913, and his role was to fully represent workers in the proposed home rule parliament.

In 1920, Jim Larkin was convicted under charges of criminal anarchy after he had travelled to the U.s to raise funds against the British. He was released three years later and deported back to Ireland, where he formed the workers union of Ireland in 1924 and got recognition from the communist international.

In the1930’s, he decided to disappear from the limelight and the in 1940; s, in a kinder and a gentle manner, he continued to enjoy a partial rehabilitation in the labor movement before he met his death in 1947, 30th January in Dublin, Ireland.

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